Everything You Need to Know about Reese Weight Distribution and Dual Cam Sway



How Do Weight Distribution Bars Work?


Create a stable ride for your tow vehicle and trailer with a weight-distribution hitch. Adding spring bars to your towing system applies leverage, which transfers the load that is pushing down on the rear of your vehicle to all the axles on both your tow vehicle and your trailer, resulting in an even distribution of weight throughout. The result is a smooth, level ride, as well as the ability to tow the maximum capacity of your hitch.



The Most Important Weight Rating

The tongue weight rating is the most important factor in determining which size weight-distribution system you should use. If the bars of the system you choose are rated too high for your setup, they will create a rigid ride, which can result in a bouncing trailer. If, on the other hand, the bars are not rated high enough, the system will be unable to properly distribute the weight, rendering it virtually useless.


To determine the proper weight rating for a weight-distribution system, you must first determine your trailer's tongue weight. Then add to that the weight of the cargo behind the rear axle of your tow vehicle. These two measurements make up the tongue weight rating for a weight-distribution system.



What is Reese Dual-Cam Sway Control?



Reese's dual-cam sway-control system stops trailer sway before it begins. This is a significant improvement over traditional friction-style controls, which help to correct sway only after it has already begun. This specially designed system uses unique sliding devices called "cams" to suspend the spring bars of your weight-distribution system. One end of a cam bolts onto your trailer's frame, and the other end attaches to the lift bracket via the lift chain. The rounded, hooked ends of the spring bars then sit in these cams. The controlled placement of the spring bars keeps your system secure while still allowing enough movement for free, easy interaction between your trailer and your tow vehicle.


During basic, straight-line towing, the cams lock in place and hold the trailer steady by applying constant, consistent pressure to both sides. This keeps the trailer from swaying in crosswinds. When you go into a turn, the cams unlock and slide to allow a controlled, full-radius maneuver. If you swerve suddenly, the cams will adjust to accommodate the movement while still working to obtain a straight angle, thereby maintaining control of the trailer.